Oh My Glob! Oh My Glob!

googlevideos:

sex is a lot like a hot bath

once you get your balls in the worst part’s over and you can get your torso and arms and stuff in

i’ve never had sex

(Source: aidn, via lordofthefabulousness)

posted 1 day ago

timelordanon:

timelordanon:

can you put brownie mix in a waffle iron

image

I AM THE FUTURE

(Source: bartonbones, via dutchster)

posted 1 day ago
  • Status: Rain! :)
  • Older person on Facebook: Us too, so badly needed as well. Tell your mom I said hi. How is the family? Tell everyone hi from us. We miss you all so much. Wish we could be there. You're a beautiful young woman.
posted 1 day ago
dutchster:

i’m glad bo shares my thought on this

dutchster:

i’m glad bo shares my thought on this

(via dutchster)

posted 1 day ago
yayfeminism:

x
posted 1 day ago

tsukishimake1:

my favorite tidbit about rome is that in the mid-1800s one of the popes didnt like the statues in rome having dicks so he ordered them knocked off. fast forward to the last decade or so and art historians in conjunction with the vatican are trying to erm. restore. the statues. but the dicks were just. kept in a box. so art historians are going around rome, with a box of dicks, trying to match them up to their owner.

(via lordofthefabulousness)

posted 1 day ago
joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

joerojasburke:

But seriously, how quickly could a giant sauropod dinosaur react to an attack on a body part 150 feet from its brain? The excellent blog SV-POW! has the answer:

… sauropods really did have individual sensory nerve cells that ran from their extremities (tip of tail, soles of feet)–and from the rest of their skin–to their brainstems. In the longest sauropods, these cells were probably something like 150 feet long, and may have been the longest cells in the history of life. We haven’t found any fossils of these nerves and almost certainly never will, but we can be sure that sauropods had them because all vertebrates do, from hagfish on up. That’s just how we’re built. So how long does it take to send a nerve impulse 150 feet? The fastest nerve conduction velocities are in the neighborhood of 120 meters per second, so a signal from the very tip of the tail in a 150-foot sauropod would take about half a second to reach the brain…[continue reading]

Cartoon by Ed McLachlan, Punch magazine, 1981

(via scientificillustration)

posted 1 day ago

twloserblog:

you dont know embarrassment until you have to wear science goggles over your glasses

(via the-absolute-funniest-posts)

posted 1 day ago

tylerslittleshit:

tylerslittleshit:

english is not my first language and all my life i thought brussel sprouts was the name of some celebrity

everyone is always like “i hate brussel sprouts” and all this time i was here thinking what the fuck did that poor guy do

(via ifyoulaugh)

posted 1 day ago

anglepoiselamp:

Tired swimmer rescued in Finland

During the first weekend of November, a Finnish man was kayaking on a lake in a thick fog. He saw something floating in the water, and when he got closer he saw that it was a Northern Hawk-Owl. It was clearly exhausted and the man lifted it out of the freezing water onto the tip of his kayak. The owl then crawled to his lap for warmth and burrowed under his lifejacket.

Since his original destination was too far away, the man decided to head for a nearby art museum on the lake shore. Once there he was eagerly assisted by both visitors and a museum guide, who took the bird in to rest and dry up next to a warm stove.  At the end of the day the owl had recovered and was released back into the wild.

How the owl ended up in the lake in the first place remains a mystery. It may have got lost in the fog, or have been driven out to the lake by Hooded Crows (if a flock spots a predatory bird they tend to chase it away quite aggressively).

(This is my summarized translation of the article which is only available in Finnish. No copyright infringement is intended, only sharing this to celebrate the brave little owl and all the people who helped him.)

(via weekendlyfe)

posted 2 days ago


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